Hi,


To the previous part of the series:
ScanRail Tour 2004 - 16: Myrdal - Bergen - Stavanger (50 p.)
http://www.railroadforums.com/forum/...vanger-(50-p-)




July 22 2004

We return to the idyllic quarter Gamle Stavanger.




Stavanger cat.




The prosperity of Stavanger has been based on oil for a long time: First, sardine cans were invented here, later followed the North Sea oil drills.




At 12:50, we boarded train 724 to Kristiansand / 82 on to Oslo.




Soon after departure, we crossed this rocky landscape.









After three hours, pirates' nest and ferry port Kristiansand was reached.




Train 73 from Oslo arrived shortly later.









Class BM 73-meeting.




A further four hours later, our train terminated at Drammen.




We continued to Oslo by rail replacement bus.




Buses stopped directly along the platform at Oslo Sentral station next to a class BM 70 towards Lillehammer.





July 23 2004

After a short night at the nearby hotel, I captured sleeper train 606 from Bergen punctually at 6:23 a.m.




Flytoget airport trains to Gardermoen pass through Oslo Sentral. This connection is operated by sixteen three-part class BM 71 units, which had been built 1997-98 by Adtranz Strømmen.




It was the short-lived "Linx"-era: Linx AB had been founded in 2001 by SJ and NSB for express connections Oslo - Stockholm / Gothenburg / Copenhagen, modernizing seven X2000 units. The first service Oslo - Stockholm started in summer 2002, Oslo - Copenhagen followed a year later. However, as this picture was taken, the end of Linx already had been decided on - the last train departed in December 2004, all units returned to Sweden.




BM 73B in red livery are additionally equipped with tilt technology and operate on the Østfold Railway towards Halden.




A class BM 70 approached from Lodalen depot, the tracks to the right lead to the Østfold Line, to the left to the Gjøvik and Bergen Line, Gardermoen and all other routes north- and eastwards.




Linx to Copenhagen next to the night train from Bergen.




NSB livery, SJ markings on the sleeping car.









BM 700016 departing towards Lillehammer.









Tracks 12 and 13 continue westwards under the city through Oslotunnel to Skøyen. This 11925 ft long tunnel line had been opened in 1980 and includes a station, National Theatre. It partly leads parallel to the underground (locally called "Tunnelbane" or "T-Bane") on a second level.




Two- and three-part class BM 69 units.




Some Flytoget trains continue through the tunnel to Drammen.




BM 69032 had been named "Røskva" in 1993.




Class El 18 and coaches from Gjøvik.




BM 69B (1974-75) in front of the Oslo skyline.









Class BM 73 full house.




BM 71 emerging from the tunnel.




The first tram of the day in front of the station.




After breakfast, on our city tour, I spotted this class SL-79 (1979 is the year it had been ordered). The first units had been delivered in 1982 by Duewag, later vehicles followed from Strømmens Verkseted in 1983.




The second class in use are SL-95, produced 1999-2004 by Ansaldo - so, new at the time.




Past an office of the Norwegian rail network provider.









Wall paintings by Munch from 1909-1916 at the university aula.
Outside, we were interviewed by a TV station about street maintenance work during summer - we told them, it was the same in Austria.




A visit to the Vikings - I especially like the bent swords.




In front of King's Castle, I encountered this interesting solution for tramway track works: the vehicle passes this barrier to stop oncoming traffic...




... and changes tracks via these auxiliary rails.
This unit had been produced in Germany by Duewag.




Slottsparken stop.




After Stockholm, our second changing of the guard on this trip.














Of course you try to make a serious face - but not always.




Next on: open air Norsk Folkemuseum on Bygdøy peninsula.




Russian-Norwegian friendship still was celebrated back then.




The T-bane emerges from the underground at Majorstuen.




Third-rail powered class OS T1000 had been delivered 1960–1976 and has been completely replaced by Siemens MX3000 since. The last unit operated in 2009, Oslo tram museum has preserved seven coaches.



We will travel on next time...