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Thread: Railroad Memorable thread

  1. #1

    Default Railroad Memorable thread

    SORRY see there is a thread for railroad memorable so could someone please more this to the proper thread THANKS.


    Would be nice if there was a Railroad Memorable thread where collectors could talk and show there collection as well as ask questions and get help. One of the many items I collect are RR uniform buttons.
    Last edited by 46u; 07-02-2009 at 04:09 PM.

  2. #2

    Default

    Nice collection.
    Tyler

    Long Live GE!!

  3. #3

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    Button information
    Browning King & CO.
    1860-1934

    Dates of operation 1880-1972
    Location of operation of Nebraska, Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin, and South Dakota
    Successors
    Chicago & North Western
    Union Pacific Railroad

    The Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis and Omaha Railway or Omaha Road (reporting mark CMO) was a railroad in the U.S. states of Nebraska, Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin, and South Dakota. It was incorporated in 1880 as a consolidation of the Chicago, St. Paul and Minneapolis Railway and North Wisconsin Railway, and the Chicago and North Western Railway gained control in 1882. The Chicago & North Western leased the Omaha Road in 1957 and merged the company into itself in 1972. In 1995 Union Pacific Railroad bought out Chicago & North Western.

  4. #4

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    Button information
    SUPERIOR QUALITY

    Dates of operation 1900-1967
    Locations of operation
    Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Florida
    Successor Seaboard Coast Line
    Track Gauge 4’ 8 ”
    Headquarters originally Portsmouth, VA, later Richmond, VA

    The Seaboard Air Line Railroad (reporting mark SAL), which styled itself "The Route of Courteous Service," was an American railroad whose corporate existence extended from April 14, 1900 until July 1, 1967, when it merged with the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad, its longtime rival, to form the Seaboard Coast Line Railroad. The company was headquartered in Portsmouth, Virginia until 1958, when its main offices were relocated to Richmond, Virginia. Total route mileage circa 1950 was 4,146 miles.

    The main line of the Seaboard ran from Richmond via Raleigh, North Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina, and Savannah, Georgia to Jacksonville, Florida, a major interchange point for passenger trains bringing travelers to the Sunshine State. From Jacksonville, Seaboard rails continued to such popular tourist destinations as Tampa, St. Petersburg, West Palm Beach, and Miami.

    Other important Seaboard routes included a line from Jacksonville via Tallahassee to a connection with the L&N at Chattahoochee, Florida for through service to New Orleans; a line to Atlanta, Georgia and Birmingham, Alabama connecting with the main line at Hamlet, North Carolina; and a line from the main at Norlina, North Carolina to Portsmouth, Virginia, the earliest route of what became the Seaboard.

    In the first half of the twentieth century, Seaboard, along with its main competitors Atlantic Coast Line Railroad, Florida East Coast Railway, and Southern Railway, contributed greatly to the economic development of the Southeastern United States, and particularly to that of Florida. Its primary revenues derived from bringing vacationers to Florida from the Northeast and carrying southern timber, minerals, and produce, especially Florida citrus crops, to the northern states.

    Seaboard Coast Line, together with the Chessie System, became subsidiaries of the newly created CSX Corporation on November 1, 1980, but continued to operate as separate railroads.[10] The Family Lines name and logo were dropped when SCL and L&N merged on December 29, 1982, to form the Seaboard System.

    On July 1, 1986, the Seaboard System's name was changed to CSX Transportation. Subsequently, the Chessie System was merged into CSX Transportation on August

  5. #5

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    Button Information
    Large
    W.SCULLY MONTREAL
    Small
    E.J. SCOTT &CO. MONTREAL

    Date of operation 1881- present
    Location of operation
    Canada with branches to U.S. cities Chicago, Minneapolis and New York City
    Track Gauge 4’ 8 1/2”
    Headquarters Calgary, Alberta

    The Canadian Pacific Railway (reporting mark CP), known as CP Rail between 1968 and 1996, is a Canadian Class I railway operated by Canadian Pacific Railway Limited. Its rail network stretches from Vancouver to Montreal, and also serves major cities in the United States such as Minneapolis, Chicago, and New York City. Its headquarters are in Calgary, Alberta.

    The railway was originally built between eastern Canada and British Columbia between 1881 and 1885 (connecting with Ottawa Valley and Georgian Bay area lines built earlier), fulfilling a promise extended to British Columbia when it entered Confederation in 1871. It is Canada's first transcontinental railway. Now primarily a freight railway, the CPR was for decades the only practical means of long distance passenger transport in most regions of Canada, and was instrumental in the settlement and development of Western Canada. The CP company became one of the largest and most powerful in Canada, a position it held as late as 1975. Its primary passenger services were eliminated in 1986 after being assumed by VIA Rail Canada in 1978. A beaver was chosen as the railway's logo because it is one of the national symbols of Canada and represents the hardworking character of the company. The object of both praise and condemnation for over 120 years, the CPR remains an indisputable icon of Canadian nationalism.
    The Canadian Pacific Railway is a public company with over 15,000 employees and market capitalization of 7 billion USD in 2008.

  6. #6

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    Button information
    BROPHY & PETRIE CHICAGO
    Large 1910’s
    WATERBURY BUTTON CO.
    Small 1849-1965

    Date of operation 1847-1986
    Location of operation
    Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Washington, and Wisconsin
    Track Gauge 4’ 81/2”
    Successor
    Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific Railroad Company
    Soo Line Railroad
    Wisconsin and Southern
    Headquarters Chicago, Illinois

    Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway Company - Name changed from Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway Company February 11, 1874. Voted by Board of Directors to enter receivership March 17,1925. Deeded to Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific RR December 31, 1927.

    Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific Railroad Company Incorporated March 31, 1927 better known as the Milwaukee Road to operate reorganized Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Ry. Officially began operating January 13, 1928. Filed voluntary petition to reorganize December 19, 1977. Embargoed operations of "Lines West" effective 12:01AM March 1, 1980. Court Approves abandonment of all Lines West of Miles City, Mt., April 2, 1980. Sold to SOO Line RR becomes The Milwaukee Road, Inc., February 19, 1985. Absorbed into SOO Line RR January 1, 1986.

  7. #7

    Thumbs up

    Hey, that's a great idea! I think we all have one or more RR artifacts in our closet or trainrooms.

  8. #8

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    Button information
    Browning King & CO.
    1860-1934

    Dates of operation 1880-1972
    Location of operation of Nebraska, Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin, and South Dakota
    Successors
    Chicago & North Western
    Union Pacific Railroad

    The Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis and Omaha Railway or Omaha Road (reporting mark CMO) was a railroad in the U.S. states of Nebraska, Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin, and South Dakota. It was incorporated in 1880 as a consolidation of the Chicago, St. Paul and Minneapolis Railway and North Wisconsin Railway, and the Chicago and North Western Railway gained control in 1882. The Chicago & North Western leased the Omaha Road in 1957 and merged the company into itself in 1972. In 1995 Union Pacific Railroad bought out Chicago & North Western.

  9. #9

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    Button information
    WANAMAKER & BROWN
    1860’s

    Date of operation 1829- present
    Location of operation New York and Pennsylvania
    Track Gauge 4’ 81/2”

    The Delaware and Hudson Railway (reporting mark DH) is a railroad that operates in the northeastern United States. Since 1991 it has been a subsidiary of the Canadian Pacific Railway, although CPR has assumed all operations and the D&H does not maintain any locomotives and rolling stock.
    It was formerly an important bridge line, connecting New York with Montreal, Quebec. The company started out as the Delaware and Hudson Canal Company, which built a canal running from Kingston, New York on the Hudson River southwest to Port Jervis, New York on the Delaware River and beyond to the anthracite coal fields at Carbondale, Pennsylvania. The canal company later built a railroad, one of the first railroads in the United States, later known as the Delaware and Hudson Company and then the Delaware and Hudson Railroad until 1968.
    The D&H has called itself "America's oldest continually operated transportation company".

  10. #10

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    Button information
    Waterbury Button Co
    1849-1965

    Dates of operation 1846-1968
    Successor Penn Central
    Headquarters Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
    Track Gauge 4’ 8 ”

    The Pennsylvania Railroad (reporting mark PRR) was an American railroad, founded in 1846. Commonly referred to as the "Pennsy", the PRR was headquartered in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

    The PRR was the largest railroad by traffic and revenue in the U.S. throughout the first two-thirds of the twentieth century and was at one time the largest publicly traded corporation in the world. At its peak, it controlled about 10,000 miles (16,000 km) of rail line. During its history, the PRR merged with or had an interest in at least 800 other rail lines and companies. The PRR corporation still holds the record for the longest continuous dividend history: it paid out annual dividends to shareholders for more than 100 years in a row. The budget for the PRR was larger than that of the U.S. government; it employed about 250,000 workers.

    In 1968, the Pennsylvania Railroad merged with its rival, the New York Central Railroad, to form the Penn Central Transportation Company. The Interstate Commerce Commission required that the ailing New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad be added in 1969. A series of events including inflation, poor management, abnormally harsh weather and the withdrawal of a government-guaranteed $200-million operating loan forced the Penn Central to file for bankruptcy protection on June 21, 1970. The viable parts of the Penn Central system were transferred in 1976 to Conrail, which began earning a profit in 1981. The Norfolk Southern Railway and CSX Transportation split Conrail in approximately equal portions in 1999, with the former now owning the old Pennsy Main Line across Pennsylvania.

    The Pennsylvania Railroad's corporate symbol was the keystone, which is Pennsylvania's state symbol, with the letters PRR intertwined inside. When colored, it was bright red with a silver-gray inline and lettering.

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