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Thread: Winter in China 1: Beijing railroad museum (40 p.)

  1. #1

    Smile Winter in China 1: Beijing railroad museum (40 p.)

    Hi,


    Actually I had planned to visit my long time dream destination, India, this February. But as I learned that there still was a last remainder of steam in China and wanted to watch "real" working steam at least once in my life, I decided to postpone this trip by a year. I chose a guided tour for the first time in my life, with Bernd Seiler ( http://www.farrail.de ). This choice proved to be the right one, many things would only have been possible in a much longer time travelling individually, others wouldn't have been possible at all due to lack of relations to the local railroad authorities. Also, Bernd's knowledge of locations is unbeatable and his urge to get the own photo even after that many years provides optimal photo opportunities for all group members.
    Additionally, the weather was simply perfect, after the horror news of bad weather to the south of China many relatives and friends called me but I literally didn't spot a single cloud the whole time!


    On Monday January 28 I left Frankfurt for Beijing, dinner over Warshaw, breakfast over Ulan Bator.

    For lunch on Tuesday we had our first share of chinese food at a snack restaurant near the airport, where our hotel was located as well.


    Which transportation should we take? This time it was the bus...


    Since we had to wait for other group members (luckily just 10 overall) arriving on different flights we couldn't travel on the same day, so I had my introduction to the chinese railroading world inside the Beijing railroad museum which is also close to the airport. A quite sterile experience - very much the opposite of what was about to follow - but still interesting for a newbie like me. The other group members were already veterans with many China steam trips.


    You are greeted by two JF Mikados ("Jie Fang" - "Liberation"), JF 304 "Mao Zhedong" to the right, JF 1191 "General Zhu De" to the left.


    "ruanwoche", a "soft" sleeper


    The "General"'s cab








    shiny Mao





    head to head


    The modern half of the hall:
    DFH3 ("DongFangHong" - "The East is red") diesel





    DF5 ("DongFeng" - "East Wind") next to SS1 ("Shao Shan" - Mao's birthplace) electric


    DF4 and SS1





    BJ ("Beijing", I also will see it in operation later on) and a DF class


    The cab of Henschel-loco NY5, with resemblance to Austrian class 2050


    German inscriptions





    BJ-cab


    SS5 electric


    "gongwuche", official inspection car with three-axled bogies


    "xingliche", luggage car


    back to the steamers





    JF 2101





    QJ 101 ("Qian Jin" - "Advance"), a real monster


    Luckily I will still get a little share of working QJs








    Before the chinese standard classes were built, a huge variety of steamers from all around the world could be found in the country. Here a Belgian built example in creative orange livery...

















    And a final picture with evening sun
    Greetings,
    Roni

    Up-to-date on Twitter: https://twitter.com/raildata_info @raildata_info
    Roni's trip reports and videos:

    http://raildata.info

  2. #2

    Default

    And Roni returns with another killer set of photos!

    Beautiful! Can't wait to see the action pictures and video. I assume this was the 100 year celebration of steam in China?
    Brian Bundridge
    Puyallup, Washington
    Check out my photos on Smugmug!
    Want the latest news and information on Seattle Transit? Check out Seattle Transit Blog!
    Mt. Rainier Scenic Railroad Conductor/Student Engineer

  3. #3

    Default

    Those shots are stunning

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Somewhere in Oklahoma
    Posts
    1,659

    Default

    Wow.

    Super fabulous images...

    April

    P.S. Any US-built steamers still around (in China)? If so, any details (builder/wheel arrangment/year built) can be offered.
    Different cake. Just as sweet.

  5. #5

    Default

    Hi,

    Thanks! :-)

    @ Macster:
    The first railroad was built in China in 1876...
    All steam I photographed was as regular as it can get!

    @ April:
    No, all Chinese standard classes built in the 2nd half of the 20th century: SY, JS, QJ and narrow gauge C2, that's it. But they all look quite American...
    Greetings,
    Roni

    Up-to-date on Twitter: https://twitter.com/raildata_info @raildata_info
    Roni's trip reports and videos:

    http://raildata.info

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Somewhere in Oklahoma
    Posts
    1,659

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ronik24 View Post
    @ April:
    No, all Chinese standard classes built in the 2nd half of the 20th century: SY, JS, QJ and narrow gauge C2, that's it. But they all look quite American...
    I was thinking that but I just had to ask when I saw pic 36.



    April
    Different cake. Just as sweet.

  7. #7

    Default

    I'm still trying to figure out why a locomotive has a steering wheel...
    Jeff Shultz
    Willamette & Pacific - Oregon Electric Branch
    My Railroad and model railroad photos

  8. #8

    Default

    Hi,

    That's the throttle, quite usual for older European electrics and diesel locos.
    Greetings,
    Roni

    Up-to-date on Twitter: https://twitter.com/raildata_info @raildata_info
    Roni's trip reports and videos:

    http://raildata.info

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Lincolnshire, England (recently Ptuj, Slovenia)
    Posts
    76

    Default

    What an amazing, extensive and immaculate muzeum! Superb pictures!

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