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Thread: Most powerful locomotive in the world

  1. #21

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    Seek and ye shall find.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UIC_classification

    Essentially two sets of two bogies (trucks in American RR parlance) with three axles each. Each axle being driven by its own traction motor. The "+" is used to indicate two seperate vehicles permanently coupled or one unit with two prime movers (or more if you have additional "+" in the mix).
    Tommy Warshaw III
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  2. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Gift View Post
    This locomotive doesn't look very heavy. Is it heavy enough to make use of all that horsepower?
    Or will a lot of wheel slip occur?
    Do they add weight to engines?

    At full power, do they use BOTH pantographs?
    The locomotive isn't heavy by American standards (about 132 tons) or about the same as a GP40. They do not have problems with wheelslip because their train operating philosophy is different from the US. They were designed to be both passenger and freight power over the Gotthard Pass. This line has long sustained grades of 2.7 %. Because of the large numbers of trains operating (before the recession 200+ per day) on a double-track line, train speeds need to be higher than those seen in the USA. So all trains including freight need to be capable of climbing the grades at 50mph (80 kph). The Re 620 is rated to pull an 880 ton train up the grade at 50 mph. Typically the Re 620 is paired with a "little brother" Re 420 to pull a freight train over the pass as their combined rating is equal to the European coupler strength. To operate a heavier train a pusher is required.

    Even at full power only one pantograph is required. The second is a spare. On very rare occasions were ice has formed on the contact wire a second pantograph will be raised to strip off the ice allowing the second pantograph to make good contact. This is very rare since most Swiss rail lines see traffic around the clock.

  3. #23

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    CSX 699 is back to 6000HP. It recived the new 6000 HP GEVO not too long ago, as the 7HDL's in them are being torn out and the 16 cyl GEVO motor is being put in. Guess these would be ES60AC's.

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  4. Default

    Technically electrics are not locomotives since they require an external power sorce. Locomotive means self propelled.
    LWB

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by LWB View Post
    Technically electrics are not locomotives since they require an external power sorce. Locomotive means self propelled.
    LWB
    An external power source does not make it any less self-propelled. The external power source isn't propelling the locomotive anyway. The electric motors fed by electricity are. I think you are confused as to what self-propelled actually means.

    self∑-propelled (-prə peld′)
    adjective
    propelled by its own motor or power

    Yeah, I'd say that electric locomotives meet that criteria.
    Last edited by Eastern Railfan; 09-24-2010 at 09:42 PM.
    Tommy Warshaw III
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  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by maersksealand3329 View Post
    CSX 699 is back to 6000HP. It recived the new 6000 HP GEVO not too long ago, as the 7HDL's in them are being torn out and the 16 cyl GEVO motor is being put in. Guess these would be ES60AC's.
    I would disagree with them being "ES" engines. The only thing these units have in common with evolution series engines is the prime mover. None of the internals are the same ie. Electricals, cooling, cab etc. Doesn't CSX still label these CW60AC even after the engine swap? That right there would tell me they don't consider this to be a "ES" engine.
    Long live the throaty growl and bark of the HDL. These locomotives have made some of the most enjoyable trips in existence and their sound will thoroughly be missed. Nothing like the 5th notch when the HDL really comes to life and both turbo's spool up and start to sing.

    Brett
    La Grande, OR

  7. Default

    I don't know how this Russian LNG locomotive rates, but would appreciate comparisons. It's power is rated at 8.3 MW. http://www.railwaygazette.com/news/s...age-tests.html

  8. Default

    I figured that 8.3 megawatts equals 1143 horsepower. What do you think of this locomotive? Natural gas is about half the price of diesel, so I am thinking the bean counters will rule.

  9. Default

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of...otives_by_Mass Found my own answer.
    Do you have a better one?

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