WW2 railroad unit photo album found...

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p51

Marty, it runs on steam!
#1
I was ready to go to a Cowboy Action shoot this morning, the first I'd gone to in many months and a small household accident made me miss the start. Bitter over that, I went to the next town and hit some antique places. At a antique mall, I found a WW2 scapbook from a Army RR engineer in Europe, plenty of Army train photos in it, for less than ten clams! So it worked out all right after all...
The odd part is that you rarely ever find stuff like this there and they only wanted so little for it! :D It's missing a lot of the photos, but the ones left are pretty interesting!


 
#4
Looks like the Allies did a good job taking care of that bridge!

Squinting at the photo, it looks like maybe there's a tunnel at the other side of the river. I tried googling the hand written caption to try to locate the bridge, but no luck. Wonder where it is?
 

p51

Marty, it runs on steam!
#5
Looks like the Allies did a good job taking care of that bridge!
Squinting at the photo, it looks like maybe there's a tunnel at the other side of the river. I tried googling the hand written caption to try to locate the bridge, but no luck. Wonder where it is?
Could be a name the locals gave for the bridge itself. My primary hbby is WW2 research and collecting, and I have many photos you'll never be able to ID. I collect RR unit stuff when I can find it, have most of the tech manuals of the period for RR ops as well, the perfect cross-hobby items!
The real heroes in my opinion weren't the trainmen at all, but the engineer and ordnance units who kept all that maintained and rebuilt all the stuff we plastered before the GI's got there. Most European RR crews were terrified of taking a train out in daytime, even under orders. RR lines were what the Vietnam generation called, "Free fire zones" and OK for anyone to blast the heck out of them. There's no telling how many civilian RR crewmen were killed by allied airpower during the war. I'm not saying that to demonize the allies (I was a US Army officer and had uncles in WW2), just saying that so people think of that each time they see the gun camera films on TV of locomotives getting lit up in WW2.
 
#6
Taking out your enemy's lines of communication has always been one of the principal goals of any war, and that makes railroads a key target; it's been that way ever since the American Civil War, where hundreds of miles of track were destroyed and rebuilt constantly by both sides. It's hard on the civilian crews, but if taking out trains keeps you from losing, then they're SOL.
 



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