US Roadtrip 2017 - 14: Oh là là! Deux tours Eiffel pendant un voyage (50 p.)

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ronik24

Proud Earthling
#1
Hi,



To the previous part of the series:
US Roadtrip 2017 - 13: Almost Hit the Golden Spike on the Head (50 p.)
http://www.railroadforums.com/forum...most-Hit-the-Golden-Spike-on-the-Head-(50-p-)



The video for this series (please set to 1080p quality / full-screen mode):
https://youtu.be/W5HFQsdVA0o

Wild-West-gallery:
http://raildata.info/nnry17

Multimedia slideshow:
https://youtu.be/3Zw2d6o1lmk




At the end of summer, the final part of the US winter trip:


February 28 2017

We return to Ogden Union Station, opened in 1924.




No, it's not St. Mark's Basilica... above the other entrance the inscription says "Southern Pacific Lines".




Unexpected in Utah? A French "40 et 8" boxcar for 40 men or 8 horses which had served as a troop carrier in both world wars. In 1949, France sent the so called "Merci Train" as thankyou for the liberation to the people of America. It consisted of 49 loaded cars which were distributed to the states.

More info:
http://www.raildata.info/us17/tafel6.jpg





We already have explored the interior of the Utah State Railroad Museum last time, now let's take a look at the vehicle exhibition outside.




To the right FEF-3 ("four-eight-four") #833, to the left an EMD DDA40X "Centennial", which had been put into operation in 1969 - a century after the transcontinental railroad had been finished. After the construction of these gigantic engines, a paradigm change followed on North American railroads - towards more compact locomotives working together in flexible multiple units.

More about Northern #833:
http://www.raildata.info/us17/tafel5.jpg

DDA40X #6916:
http://www.raildata.info/us17/tafel4.jpg





The famous four axle truck of the DDA40X.














To the right the first SD-45 delivered to Southern Pacific, #7457 built in 1966 - to the left D&RGW "tunnel motor" #5371 which had served as helper in Helper until 2008, the only one left in original Rio Grande livery.

More about #5371:
http://www.raildata.info/us17/tafel3.jpg

#7457:
http://www.raildata.info/us17/tafel2.jpg





A highlight is gas turbine-electric locomotive #26, in operation 1961-1970, due to their jet-like noise these engines had been nicknamed "Big Blow".

More info:
http://www.raildata.info/us17/tafel1.jpg

and:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Union_Pacific_GTELs










More museum vehicles are stabled on tracks 1 and 2 along the former platform. The last regular passenger train stopping here was Amtrak "Pioneer" Seattle - Chicago in 1997.




Southern Pacific #3769, an EMD GP9R from 1957.




#1237, a GE 44-ton switcher once operated by the US Air Force.




This rotary snowplow is standing on tracks leading towards the new FrontRunner station and bus interchange.




View towards the active UP-yard.




Cargill EMD SW1 #6751 had been constructed in September 1940 as B&O #213.




Historic and current UP engines, connected by the new bridge of the FrontRunner line.




More vehicles are kept behind the stars of the exhibition.









The unique "torch relay car" for the 2002 Olympic winter games.




I emerged between "Tunnel Motor" and "Centennial".

Here you can find even more details about the museum:
http://www.rgusrail.com/utous.html





It was time for lunch - once more we found a microbrewery in the vicinity, "Roosters" on historic 25th Street. Without car, I finally could sample their beer specialties.
In this winter sport town, even street signs have to be warmed... ;-)




Nostalgic ad posters in the brewery.




The old house facades lead straight to the Union Station. We bought dessert at the bakery.




Subsequently, we returned to the FrontRunner station.




The train from Provo and Salt Lake City appeared exactly as a local freight hauled by UP EMD SD60 #2212 (built in 1986), SD40N #1904 (built as SD40-2 #3750 in 1980) and SD40-2 #3721 arrived.




A virtual sandwich of both trains at the overpass.




The old passenger tracks of Union Station viewed from the new Front-Runner platform.




The upper deck of a Bombardier BiLevel coach:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bombardier_BiLevel_Coach





At Salt Lake City yard, I took this picture through the distorting window glass. We already know switching EMD GP38-2 #847 from the first part of the reports.




At Warm Springs Relief Point, crews are changed on this wooden auxiliary platform. Passengers are informed via announcement, see video:
https://youtu.be/W5HFQsdVA0o?t=1m19s

The hall in the background also houses Stadler US: http://www.stadlerrail.com/en/about-us/locations/stadler_us_inc





North Temple interchange.




This TRAX took me back to the hotel.





March 1 2017

Next morning, I took a walk. You don't see a tram with six raised pantographs every day.




I wanted to take a photo with depot from the other side as well.




Then it was time to get to the airport.




We already were reminded of home. ;-)




Once more a Delta 767 waited for us, this A330, however, flew to Hawaii.














View above Ogden along the Wasatch Front towards Salt Lake City. The railroad leads parallel to Interstate 15 to the left.




And a last time back at the Great Salt Lake.




East of the mountains the rest of the flight during daylight the snow cover stayed unbroken. We caught a final glimpse of the landscape at Rapid City, South Dakota.





March 2 2017

At sunrise, we approached Ireland across the Atlantic, landing punctually at Paris airport Charles de Gaulle. As we had a few hours, we took RER suburban train line B directly from terminal 2 to Denfert-Rochereau and continued from there by Métro line 6 to Trocadéro.




Voilà - how often do you get two Eiffel towers on one journey?
Of course, we could have flown home via China... but these are the two biggest ones. ;-)
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/08/28/replicas-eiffel-tower_n_3721294.html





Five of the Paris subway lines feature rubber-tired trains.




We returned the same way via Denfert-Rochereau taking the not particularly sightly RER trains.




The last leg of the trip was covered by Austrian Airbus A320, we taxied to take-off past the Concorde memorial. From the air, I spotted a TGV (back then it was still called TGV and RER, now they have been renamed).




The sunset below the cloud cover over Germany provided a lovely end to the sadly way too short trip, nevertheless featuring many fascinating impressions. Sometime I will probably travel to the West again, but definitely just in a couple of years and during a warmer season - if no more winter steam photo events get in the way. :)
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Hotrail

New Member
#3
I was checking this web site almost every day to view your last post of your US road trip 2017. I am glad that you took the time to load it. Excellent photos all the way through. It was fun to see what a railfan from Austria thought of the US and how you would shoot our trains. I enjoyed your trip. Looking forward to your next trip.
Dan Simmering
 

ronik24

Proud Earthling
#4
Thanks a lot, guys! :)

Look out on the International Railroad Photography board for my next report by the end of the week...
 



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