Storage and Backup

Affiliate Disclosure: We may receive a commision from some of the links and ads shown on this website (Learn More Here)

How do you store and backup your Digital Files

  • I do Not save my Digital Files after they are processed and posted online (Please Explain)

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • I save all my Digital Files on my computer hard drive

    Votes: 3 20.0%
  • I have all my Digital Files on an External Hard drive

    Votes: 10 66.7%
  • I have all my Digital Files stored "In the Cloud"

    Votes: 1 6.7%
  • Other (please explain)

    Votes: 1 6.7%

  • Total voters
    15
#1
I wonder what people are doing to Storage and Backup of their Digital Files?

I still have every Digital Photo I have taken. I have 2 external hard drives, I keep one at home and one is a second location away from the house. They both have the same thing on them so if one gets destroyed, I still have a backup.

I am a huge fan of "The Cloud". I have already switched my Microsoft Excel and Word Files to Google Docs. Next I would like to have something like carbonate so all my photos are stored "In the Cloud". Currently I have 2+TB of photos so I will need to find something secure, but also cost efficient.
 
#3
#5
Two external hard drives; one a small (two disk) RAID drive which is my primary backup, and one single disk drive that I keep in a (supposedly) fire resistant safe.

No cloud storage for me. The external hard drives can't be hacked when they're turned off.
 

kenw

5th Generation Texian
#6
The subject often comes up on photography forums and a consensus seems to have emerged that goes something like this:

1) Archive: 2 (minimum) external hard disk drives, not normally connected to the computer (for virus, ESD, et al reasons), with at least one located remotely. This is my scenario (my #1 is in a drawer near the home computer, #2 drive is at work). This is for longterm backup and recovery purposes, not for frequently-accessed files. This requires you to determine based on your work habits when a file/folder is moved to the remote drives. Again, an actively working session isn’t moved. The cloud is suitable for this but a bit costly for most folks. HDDs usually get the nod due to value, but some do use thumbdrives, CD/DVD, or even SD storage. My older files are on CD and DVD, but even these were copied to HDD for ease of recovery; in those cases I’ve actually got 4 backups (CD/DVD and HDD at home and work). BTW, I don’t replace an HDD unless I need to. When I need more, I buy a moderately large one and start from there, not moving files from the older drive. The goal isn’t to have all the archived files on a single drive, it’s to have them archived period. If that takes 3-4 separate HDDs all the better actually since a failure won’t take out the entire archive. You have another archive to recover from, right? In fact, I often used old, smaller HDDs that I had replaced in computers. Buy an external drive case for it ($10-20), reformat and, viola! you have a backup drive. At home it’s a 250gb, at work I have a 320gb. When these are full, I’ll buy more.

2) Backup: a pure backup, with ready access, for files presently in process; these you are still working, tweaking, whatever. For me this is on the computer’s internal HDD for the working files and still on the camera’s card for ready back-up, altho in some cases it may be the tablet and card. If you keep them on the card, you might need a few more cards. They’re cheap. I’m using a 16gb and haven’t had an issue yet. Wedding shooters tend to have problems with having enough cards, but not most folks.

Regardless, you must develop a disciplined procedure to cull your shots. Just because storage is cheap, it doesn’t mean that you should save all the real rejects. Yes, you have to define what a cull is, but it makes no sense to spend time and money storing out-of-focus shots, and in our case, the 47 sequence files of the approaching train. If it is something special, I may be rattling off a few dozen at 6+fps. But you can bet that not every one of them is saved. You decide, but pick a few of the best, dump the rest. It isn’t the storing that’s the issue, it’s finding the one you want later.
 

kenw

5th Generation Texian
#8
Two external hard drives; one a small (two disk) RAID drive which is my primary backup, and one single disk drive that I keep in a (supposedly) fire resistant safe.
....
be careful with the drive in the safe. Most safes are rated to keep internal temperatures low enough to keep paper from charring for a very limited period of time. most drives have plastics and other materials that can be damaged by less heat.

And as a friend found out a fireproof safe may resist the fire but not the water that put it out; the papers inside were not charred but were thoroughly soaked.
 
#9
No cloud storage for me. The external hard drives can't be hacked when they're turned off.
Are you worried about Someone getting your photos when its hacked or loosing your photos when its hacked. I agree and will still keep a backup on my own at home even if I go to an online backup.

be careful with the drive in the safe. Most safes are rated to keep internal temperatures low enough to keep paper from charring for a very limited period of time. most drives have plastics and other materials that can be damaged by less heat.
What about a 700lb gun safe? The ones that have 3" think walls?





.
 

Pat

Photo Critiques Welcome
#10
With any storage method there is a risk. Back up protocol calls for business always call for two copies with one stored off site. Cloud storage is gaining popularity for business. I'm moving project files out to the cloud for ease of access. But with my stuff, call me old fashioned. I like two external drives just because I know where they are. They’re cheap.

Run of the mill home safe fire ratings are generally the time it takes a fire to raise the temperature inside to 350F. With a 1 hour rating it took 1 hour to reach 350F in simulated fire. The 350F rating because paper chars around 400F. Safes for digital media if they meet a recognized rating like UL's have a lower internal temperature limit, often 125F.

There are “fire safes” with ½ hour ratings which, unless you live at the fire station, are probably useless. We have a volunteer department and, courageous as they are, the math isn’t good for short ratings. The fire starts when I’m not home. So it’ll get rolling before my neighbors sees it and call 911. Now the guys have to get rousted out of bed. Drive to the station, get the trucks and get to my house.
 

KenSz

New Member
#12
I have 4 external hard drives and make 2 back up DVDs of all RAW files. I started doing this after having and external hard drive go bad and lost some files. I managed to get most of the files off the failing drive and back them up on other drives.
 


RailroadForums.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com

RailroadBookstore.com - An online railroad bookstore featuring a curated selection of new and used railroad books. Railroad pictorials, railroad history, steam locomotives, passenger trains, modern railroading. Hundreds of titles available, most at discount prices! We also have a video and children's book section.

ModelRailroadBookstore.com - An online model railroad bookstore featuring a curated selection of new and used books. Layout design, track plans, scenery and structure building, wiring, DCC, Tinplate, Toy Trains, Price Guides and more.



Top