Sharpness and my monitor

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Bob

Forum Host
Staff member
#21
Bill, first of all, let me make it clear. I understand that there's many ways to shoot, and whatever works best for you is the way to go. I also agree that "getting it right in camera" is by far the best approach.

As for shooting in jpg, probably the majority of my work that has been sold has been jpg. I occasionally shoot dog shows as one of the photographers for a local studio, and they require all shots be done in jpg. (They also shoot Canon, while I shoot Nikon). The photos sell pretty good, and we have to get things right under challenging conditions.
 

Bob

Forum Host
Staff member
#22
So, why do I shoot in RAW then? Well, a couple of reasons. I use Lightroom extensively, it allows me to crop, adjust, re-size etc and works great for things like re-sizing for Facebook, sharpening and putting a watermark on my image, all with just one click.

Given that, there is no penalty (other than file size) for shooting RAW when you work in Lightroom. It's just like a jpg, you don't have to do anything special to a raw file. If you got it right in camera, you're good. No changes needed, export at your desired resolution and ratio (4 x 5, 4 x 6 etc) and you're good to go.

However, you can also make much better use of your camera's dynamic range. I love to shoot bald eagles. However, the reflective white heads and feathers that are so dark brown most folks think they're black, make things a challenge, especially on a sunny day. Typically a jpg won't cover a dynamic range that wide. However, in lightroom, I can go in, and bring up the detail in the shadows, bringing out feather details. In a raw file, you can do that. In a jpg, the camera makes the choices on the fly and discards much of the image data. So, if you have a scene where you want more details or to bring up details and drop highlights a touch (I'm looking at you, Bald Eagles), you can do it with RAW.

You don't have to do it, you can treat them just like a jpg. However, by shooting in RAW you give yourself that option if you need it.
 



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