RPA’s T-REX plan wants to integrate NYC area systems

Affiliate Disclosure: We may receive a commision from some of the links and ads shown on this website (Learn More Here)

Bob

Forum Host
Staff member
#1
A new report from Regional Plan Association (RPA) calls for the merging of Metro-North Railroad, New Jersey Transit and Long Island Rail Road into a single integrated network.

RPA says the $71 billion overhaul to integrate the rail network would be implemented in three phases over the course of several decades and would result in increased capacity, expanded options and reduced travel times.

"The-New York-New Jersey-Connecticut region has an opportunity to support sustainable and equitable economic growth for future generations by building on a unique asset —the region's extensive commuter rail network. This network, if optimized, can boost job and population growth both in the region's core and in major centers throughout the region that have both the capacity and need for growth," states the executive summary of the report.

Full story: http://www.rtands.com/index.php/pas...o-integrate-nyc-area-systems.html?channel=280
 

Bob

Forum Host
Staff member
#2
Here's info and a link to the "Fourth Plan" website.

The region’s aging commuter rail network leaves many parts of the region poorly served or without rail service at all. It wasn’t designed for today’s travel patterns and has little capacity for future growth. A series of new projects, phased over the next few decades, should combine the three commuter railroads into a unified system that vastly improves mobility throughout the region. The resulting Trans-Regional Express (T-REX) would provide frequent, consistent service, directly connect New Jersey, Long Island, the Mid-Hudson and Connecticut, and allow the region’s economy to continue growing.

RPA-4RP-19-Regional-Rail.png


A new regional rail network, built in three phases, would create a unified rail network with direct service throughout the region, dramatically reduce travel times, greatly expand service across the Hudson River, reactivate rail lines in much of New Jersey, and enable regular, frequent service in the region’s urban core and much of the suburbs. Source: RPA

http://fourthplan.org/action/combined-commuter-network
 
#3
We had this once, it was called the Metropolitan region of CONRAIL, but the Government planners had a better idea. And created three or four distinct agencies to run what the private railroads had run much more efficiently. So, If we do this, what happens to all the freight traffic on the "reactivated" West Shore (River) Line? Where is the money coming from to pay for all of this? (When the private railroads ran this they were taxed to death). Who is going to benefit from this? Who is actually going to ride this? Serious questions, are their plausible answers?
 

Bob

Forum Host
Staff member
#4
I think it could make sense, though it would need a lot more study. Having all of the commuter and transit operate under one umbrella would seem to be logical. I can also see how it would be a political football and a total power struggle as each agency fights to keep their piece of the pie. For that reason alone, I'd say it's unlikely. If it does happen, it wouldn't be any time soon. Maybe a long term goal, I don't know.
 


RailroadForums.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com

RailroadBookstore.com - An online railroad bookstore featuring a curated selection of new and used railroad books. Railroad pictorials, railroad history, steam locomotives, passenger trains, modern railroading. Hundreds of titles available, most at discount prices! We also have a video and children's book section.

ModelRailroadBookstore.com - An online model railroad bookstore featuring a curated selection of new and used books. Layout design, track plans, scenery and structure building, wiring, DCC, Tinplate, Toy Trains, Price Guides and more.



Top