Rail traffic directionality

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#1
I have done some reading and found that trains may or may not adhere to the same directionality as road traffic (which in this case includes trams (streetcars)). I don't see any reason why trains should adhere to the same directionality as road traffic, and although mainland Europe has standardised on driving on the right, trains keep to the left in France, Belgian and Sweden (which drove on the left until 1967), but otherwise tend to keep right. Yet in all left side driving countries except Indonesia, trains also tend to keep left, this includes my country (Australia). Is there any historical reason for trains adhering to the same directionality as road traffic in countries where this is the case?
But is there as reason for trains not to adhere to the same directionality as cars? Note that most people are both right handed and right eye dominant, and accident statistics have even shown that driving on the left is marginally safer than driving on the right. Driving on the left, one uses one's potentially dominant right eye to view oncoming traffic and driver's side mirror. And right hand drive road vehicles are also easier to drive if one is right handed.

But what about trains. Since the most important thing when driving a train is to view signs and signals located as well as rearward view of station platforms, this means that as long as most train drivers are also right eye dominant, trains are surely better of keeping to the right.
 
#2
In North America I think the practice of running predominantly LH or RH on certain double (or multi) track lines was more prevalent in earlier years. Today, however, with modern communications and powered switches I would have to say that in multi-track territory you can expect to see trains running in any direction on any track...
 

NWR #200

Pin Puller Extraordinaire
#3
Rule definition wise, there is a difference between double track and multiple main tracks. Double track is reserved for directional running. Multiple main track allows for more then 1 track with any normal operating direction. What many railfans call double track, is technically by the rules multiple main track.
 





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