Pictures From Mechanical Loco

Affiliate Disclosure: We may receive a commision from some of the links and ads shown on this website (Learn More Here)

RailroadBookstore.com - An online railroad bookstore featuring a curated selection of new and used railroad books. Railroad pictorials, railroad history, steam locomotives, passenger trains, modern railroading. Hundreds of titles available, most at discount prices! We also have a video and children's book section.

ModelRailroadBookstore.com - An online model railroad bookstore featuring a curated selection of new and used books. Layout design, track plans, scenery and structure building, wiring, DCC, Tinplate, Toy Trains, Price Guides and more.

PEIR

Hammerhead Pusher
#82
Thank you for posting these photos. It is nice to see the inner workings of a diesel even if the parts are supposed to be on the inside:D
 
#87
More Photo's

Hey all, Its been a while and I haven't seen too much. Its been pretty slow and we have been doing a lot of maintenances. So not really condusive to good pictures.

To start we will give you a glimpse of how we tention the studs on EVO engines Power Assy's.

Here you see the tensioner atop the assy. It is hard to explain here but if you want a more info just ask and I will go into more detail. Basically this pulls on the studs then we screw down the nuts. The pressure is then let off.

This is the Hydro pump. We crank the line pressure up to 19,400PSI to tension the assy and 19,700PSI to detension.

This is a shot of me lashing the valves. If you have ever adjusted a Solid, Solid Roller or over head cam'd engine it's the same.

I had to make a road trip you Yuba Gap and found this little shack. It was pretty neat but full of wasp's so I didn't get to look too much.

This is a EVO (ES4400/C45) Intercooler. They have both Air to Water & Air to Air as you will see soon.

We had a small issue here. This was a brand new (rebuilt) Dynamic Brake fan we put into a GP60. The Parts Expiditer ordered the wrong one that was half the horsepower than the correct one. So it spun the fan twice as fast & esentially made a bomb out of it.

Here you see the Cage. It was flung up in the air and landed next to the unit.

This was our new skylight made possible by a chunk of fan.

Here we see the Air to Air Package to a ES4400/C45. There are two intercooler cores sitting in it.

Here we see the cores to the Air to Air Package.

Looks odd doesn't it? We have 2 of these for doing Truck swaps. It is a Car Truck that has a modified center casting to be used for locomotives. This summer we did a bunch of truck swaps to give our snow units better brakes.
 
#88
Always enjoy your post, they provide an up close view of what goes wrong and what it takes to keep things online. Thanks
That fan thing could have been deadly, lucky it was just a hole in the roof.
 

Cliffs

Fallbridge Sub MP 118.6
#89
Excellent pictures of more of the parts that make them work.

Glad to see you are back. The dry spell in your posts had me a little worried that someone may have been "leaning" on you about posting images from work.

That's a nice view of the process for tensioning the power assembly studs. It reminds me of my days as a marine machinist in the shipyard when we were torque-ing turbine casing studs.

The studs were hollow. We would torque them to a set amount to use as a baseline, then heat them up either by using a torch or an electric heater placed inside the stud.

After they heated up and their lengths would increase, we would remove the heat and then rotate the nuts in the tightening direction a designated number of "flats", specified by the engineers. This would give us the desired torque values after the studs cooled down.
 
#90
That fan thing could have been deadly, lucky it was just a hole in the roof.
Yes, we got VERY lucky. This could have been real bad. There were more holes in other window's too. there was also a hole punctured in one of the roll up doors. there was also large chunks thrown a few hundred feet away.
 
#91
Excellent pictures of more of the parts that make them work.

Glad to see you are back. The dry spell in your posts had me a little worried that someone may have been "leaning" on you about posting images from work.
I was actually away for 2 reasons. First I have been super busy because of my divorce and the cleaning up of the house and sorting through things to prepair for the short sale. The other was that some jagoff knocked my sisters computer off a table at her colleges library. So I lent her mine. So I was out of a computer other than my old dinosaur that is almost impossible to use.

So far I have no one "leaning" on me. It wouldn't surprise me since RR's like to be secretive and treat all knowledge as top secret. Hell We have to change out intranet passwords all the time.


That's a nice view of the process for tensioning the power assembly studs. It reminds me of my days as a marine machinist in the shipyard when we were torque-ing turbine casing studs.

The studs were hollow. We would torque them to a set amount to use as a baseline, then heat them up either by using a torch or an electric heater placed inside the stud.

After they heated up and their lengths would increase, we would remove the heat and then rotate the nuts in the tightening direction a designated number of "flats", specified by the engineers. This would give us the desired torque values after the studs cooled down.[/QUOTE]

Thats very interesting that the studs are/were hollow. For the most part it sounds like the same as what we do. But instead of heat we use hydraulics.
 
#93
More Photo's

Hi all. It's been a while since I posted or even logged in. As some mey have known I was going through a divorce. That is over and my house looks to be in the short sale process. in the mean time I have a new girlfriend and new life that doesn't leave me a lot of free time to goof off on the computer. We also didn't have much going on at our shop that was too interesting. Along with that I was in charge of a project that took me away from wrenching on units for a while.


This Power Assy came out of a 70ACE. It's hard to see but the Lower Liner that holds/seals the bottom of the Assy from the crank case and air box came or tried to come up with it upon removal. We had to torch off the ring to get the Assy out.


Here we have an EUI (Electronic Unit Injection) injector out of an EMD. It had some issues as you can see in this picture and the following one.



This shows how sick & twisted our Yard crews are. We don't know what kind of stuffed animal this was but they zip tied it to a GenSet.



I was put on this C44 and told the turbo needed removed because it was "cracked" here's what it looked like when I got to it.


This is what we found. The turbo was fully broken on the cold air side. It actually blew apart. There was dammage inside the carbody from where it was forced rearward.



Since the turbo grenaded the impeller, we had to pull the innercoolers because of the shrapnel in them. Here we see the Turbo and Innercoolers out.


This was all that was left of the impeller. It's a piece of the shaft and the nose cone.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
#95
I see you left Penryn/Newcastle for Camp Far West. Maybe you can catch a fish once in a while! Depending on the time of day for your commute, I think it should work out well.
All the best in your new life. I had to start my life over again back in 07 but that was the best thing I could have ever done. Happiness is priceless!
Glad you're back.
Bob (from Loomis)
 
#96
I see you left Penryn/Newcastle for Camp Far West. Maybe you can catch a fish once in a while! Depending on the time of day for your commute, I think it should work out well.
All the best in your new life. I had to start my life over again back in 07 but that was the best thing I could have ever done. Happiness is priceless!
Glad you're back.
Bob (from Loomis)
Hey Bob! I basically live across from the North shore entrance and love it. I partially grew up in Sheridan (yes I admit to it) and my Pop still lives there so that is nice being a bit closer to him. The downside is that my commute went from 15 to 40 minutes. But it's totally worth it living back in the country.

Glad to be back!
 





RailroadForums.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com

Top