Local rail enthusiast bored out of mind...

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njurgensen

Railfanning Meteorologist
#1
Still working on that scanner, just a matter of getting the money now...

...but in the mean time, I currently reside in a boring old apartment. I lack cable tv, internet, or for that matter anything fun to do except Xbox and that gets old. Being a typical college student, I also participate in the hobby of procrastination on homework. So the point of this thread is to ask the question: Are there any good train and/or railfan magazines out there worth subscribing to? I do enjoy the occasional light reading and so I was wondering if anyone had any kind of magazine they would prescribe. Sports Illustrated tends to get a little old for me so any suggestions would be appreciated! Thank you again.
 

kenw

5th Generation Texian
#2
Let me suggest the local or school library: free, dry, air-conditioned and a near infinite selection of reading materials, both hard copy and web-based. But surely in Omaha there are some spots trackside where a scanner is just overkill.
 
#3
Magazines to subscribe to

I'd suggest the basic one is Trains Magazine. Good overview, well edited, lots of interesting features. On the other hand, you might just want to go to the local library and use their Internet connection to access a wide variety of railroad sites.
 

CNW4404

What kind of cucumbers?
#4
Railroads Illustrated is a good one to check out, not to mention any number of the railroad historical societies' magazines. Which railroads are you most interested in?
 

SurlyKnuckle

Foam Is A Hazmat
#5
Trains is just ...well, forget that. Go with something with alittle more substance. The Railroad Press is a great magazine, and if you're a motive power junkie, I suggest Diesel Era as well.
 

njurgensen

Railfanning Meteorologist
#6
Railroads Illustrated is a good one to check out, not to mention any number of the railroad historical societies' magazines. Which railroads are you most interested in?
I'm interested in just about all railroads. I particularly love all the Class 1s, especially UP and BNSF since I live in Omaha. Just any light reading I can get that will help my railroading knowledge as well would be wonderful!
 

SDJeff

Texas Railfan
#7
Trains is just ...well, forget that. Go with something with alittle more substance. The Railroad Press is a great magazine, and if you're a motive power junkie, I suggest Diesel Era as well.
TRP & DE are the only ones I subscribe to.

Your chain bookstores like Barnes & Noble should have TRP and trains magazine with a couple of model railroading mags.
 
#8
Railroad reading

I'm interested in just about all railroads. I particularly love all the Class 1s, especially UP and BNSF since I live in Omaha. Just any light reading I can get that will help my railroading knowledge as well would be wonderful!
I'd encourage you to use your local library and read some of the wonderful books that have been written about railroading, and by railroaders, to get some backgrounding in the history and heritage. Some are from years past, some more recent, like Zepher by Henry Kisor. Also see Al Crug's on-line stories of his days on the BNSF out of Sheridan WY. Lots of good stuff out there to give you a grounding in railroadiana.
 

weekendrailroader

Guy with the green hat
#10
For the really fun stuff, find the section of the library which contains all of the old, non-circulating material.

The library near me has one of these rooms, and it is packed with everything from giant maps showing long-gone rail lines, old books documenting the railroad and other local industries, to little, one-of-a-kind works which are merely someone's notes (bound by those little plastic bindings that fall apart all the time) on a obscure railroad that only a few locals might have heard of.

One of the "note collections" that I found discussed a logging railroad on Whidbey Island (WA), which had one climax locomotive and one log car (both destroyed in a runaway wreck). Today, no one even seems to know where that railroad's roadbed ran, or probably that it even existed. It's the little treasures like these that can start a really deep (and really fun) investigation to discover the little-known past.
 



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