Kintetsu Safety Barrier

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Dick H

New Member
#1
Nice design of a barrier to keep passengers from falling between cars.
Seen at Kintetsu's YAMATO-SAIDAIJI station, Nara, Japan. Kintetsu (the Kinki Nippon Tetsudo) is
Japan's largest private railway.

 
#6
Nice design of a barrier to keep passengers from falling between cars.
Seen at Kintetsu's YAMATO-SAIDAIJI station, Nara, Japan. Kintetsu (the Kinki Nippon Tetsudo) is
Japan's largest private railway.

Re-read that first sentence, guys. Then look at some photos or video of the Tokyo subway system during rush hour. If the rush hour crowds on the Kintetsu are even remotely similar, then having these barriers in place is a very good idea. (It's probably a good idea anyway, as there have been cases where passengers have somehow fallen between cars on some U.S. commuter lines as well, and not always at rush hour, either.)
 
#7
Eja is correct, these devices are also used to keep riders (typically drunkards) from hitching a ride al fresco. It has happened in the Kansai area, which is considred by some to have more idiots than Tokyo.
 
#8
Except where this train could be at a convex platform where the train is "bent" out. You get pushed onto the side of the train, and these buggers could impale you at speed. These trains enter stations at better than 60 kp/h...

But I don't get how they would keep trespassers away. For all but the most remote of stations, you need a ticket to get on the platform. Once on the platform, who would choose to get squished between coaches rather than sit inside? I haven't ever experienced (well, in Tokyo) where anyone could even get access to the right of way outside of the station or a crossing where the train is travelling at speed.
 

Dick H

New Member
#9
Except where this train could be at a convex platform where the train is "bent" out. You get pushed onto the side of the train, and these buggers could impale you at speed. These trains enter stations at better than 60 kp/h...
If that is such a concern, I suggest you avoid Kintetsu. Maybe take Hankyu or Keihan or Hanshin, depending on where you're going
 
#10
But I don't get how they would keep trespassers away.
The miscreant may actually have a valid ticket to ride, but in an alcoholic haze, or a sudden loss of rational thought (for example, after just missing the train) he may be tempted to wedge himself in that space. As far as impalement, there is a reason there are copious amounts of warning lines (both for the sighted and blind) painted or applied to the platforms, as well as constant announcements to stand back from trains. These announcements are always cause for complaint among the foreigner population (i.e. Westerners) who complain about being in a nanny state, but then scream about safety whenever an accident occurs. Btw, never heard about an impalement with these devices. Impalements occur daily in automobile accidents, though.
 
#11
Another reason for these barriers- for the partially blind, who can still sense light and darkness, may mistake these gaps as a door opening. Recently a disabled woman fell between two cab cars coupled face to face on the JR Kobe Line, and died.
 





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