Garbage Riders

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#41
most people here dont like train riders. but i just say if you are riding the rails, lay low (like not on a porch of a well car). the more riders there are, the more eyes of security officers there are watching the trains go by, and everyone gets hassled.

yes, the way you ride affects other people. its better to not leave a trace.
 
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Trackside

Plays Well With Others
#42
Hello everyone here on railroadforums.com

I wanted to formally apologise for the other rider's crude remarks as seen above. I am not that individual and I do not represent him. I represent myself, and merely just that. With that issue set aside, I would like to let people here know that I welcome any questions or comments. I am not here to troll. However, I was invited here to merely express my passion for railroad experience and talk to other railroad enthusiasts. Anyway, to clear the air, how is everyone on here? Hope all is well.
Welcome to the forum. I'm glad to see your more civilized than you pink pants wearing colleague. :eek:;):D

So what's your story, how long you been riding the rails and where are you from?
 

Trackside

Plays Well With Others
#43
you wont get much love here because most people in this forum hate train riders. i might give you some advice though -- if you are riding the rails, lay low. sitting up on the porch of a (garbage) train exposes yourself to arrest and also is bad for other riders that just want to lay low and get from one place to another (privileged white kids get more chances than others, dont doubt it). the more riders there are, the more eyes of security officers there are watching the trains go by.

yes, the way you ride affects other riders. leave no trace! (and it's illegal tsk tsk!)
Easy BB nobody here walks on water either and the guy was banned.
 
#46
Train Riders

Ah, so glad to have done my hobo stuff back in the 60's and 70's. I wouldn't dare set foot on a freight these days. And there's not very many places to set a foot these days, either! ;-( I rode all the way across country several times back then, never got hassled (the most I had was a crewman telling me not to dangle my feet out of a boxcar door), and have many memorable trips in my repository. Thought I always took heed of other 'bo's advice to stay out of Roper Yard. There was one mean bull back then there.
 

BNSFEng

Locomotive Engineer!!!
#47
... [EDIT]. Third of all, can't anybody just ride a ... train hobo style anymore??? I mean really. Guess that means no more south bound double stacks for me. NOT!!! But all in all, i am kinda stoked that i can just find an article of me on google, and for that we thank you.
Yeah, you can't ride a train hobo style anymore. We don't want to have to rescue you when you fall off due to a sudden jolt and have your arm or leg amputated if not your HEAD!
 
#48
Hello everyone here on railroadforums.com
...However, I was invited here to merely express my passion for railroad experience and talk to other railroad enthusiasts. Anyway, to clear the air, how is everyone on here? Hope all is well.
Howdy csxtattoo,
I rode a few box cars years ago when I was 18. After that I got into mountain climbing, which was a lot scarier and more dangerous. And now I'm middle-aged and afraid to drive or cross the street. :D
 
#49
Are you familiar with North Bank Fred's website about Hobos?
I highly recommend it!
Good reading and i would say good info as well to any aspiring tramps!

Do you attend any Hobo festivals such as my birthplace of Britt, Iowa?
It is legendary in Hobo circles.

Just curious.
 

Trackside

Plays Well With Others
#50
Its interesting to see some of the established members talk about the days of hopping trains. I've felt that there is a commonality between train hoppers and rail fans in that we all have some sort or interest in trains, and I can't say that I haven't trespassed before, even in the last week to take a picture so I can't be throwing stones.

I grew up along the Woodinville Sub and had all kinds of dream of hopping the local that would come through especially after the demise of the caboose. Never did it and its a good thing cause with a train that short I'm sure I would have gotten caught if I didn't get killed, but it was tempting.

I went to college in Ellensburg when the BN reopened Stampede and I use to ride my mountain bike along the siding in Eburg. One day a empty grain pulled in and as I was riding back a pretty dirty looking guy comes out of the bushes and asks me what town this is. He had a dog and I explained that he was in Ellensburg and gave him directions to the nearest store.

We talked briefly after I asked if he had just gotten off the train and he talked about riding Stevens Pass too and how he almost froze to death on that pass. He said the empty grain cars where ideal cause you could just go inside and stay out of the wind.

I remember after that my roommate and I were making plans to try and hop one in Auburn that spring with the idea that we knew the area around Eburg well and the trains always stopped there. Another dream that never happened, but it was fun to think about riding one over Stampede.
 
#51
Riding Stampede

Its interesting to see some of the established members talk about the days of hopping trains. I've felt that there is a commonality between train hoppers and rail fans in that we all have some sort or interest in trains, and I can't say that I haven't trespassed before, even in the last week to take a picture so I can't be throwing stones.

I grew up along the Woodinville Sub and had all kinds of dream of hopping the local that would come through especially after the demise of the caboose. Never did it and its a good thing cause with a train that short I'm sure I would have gotten caught if I didn't get killed, but it was tempting.

I went to college in Ellensburg when the BN reopened Stampede and I use to ride my mountain bike along the siding in Eburg. One day a empty grain pulled in and as I was riding back a pretty dirty looking guy comes out of the bushes and asks me what town this is. He had a dog and I explained that he was in Ellensburg and gave him directions to the nearest store.

We talked briefly after I asked if he had just gotten off the train and he talked about riding Stevens Pass too and how he almost froze to death on that pass. He said the empty grain cars where ideal cause you could just go inside and stay out of the wind.

I remember after that my roommate and I were making plans to try and hop one in Auburn that spring with the idea that we knew the area around Eburg well and the trains always stopped there. Another dream that never happened, but it was fun to think about riding one over Stampede.
And I suspect that's about the last one you could ride, from Ellensburg west, but getting off at the other end would be tough. You might be able to bail out at Stampede Wye, but the eyes are there to catch you. Still wouldn't recommend it, but wouldn't it be a treat? Always living in the past.
 

p51

Marty, it runs on steam!
#52
I’ve never had any interest in hopping a freight train because you just never know when it where the thing is going to stop.
I grew up doing Civil War re-enactments as a family hobby, and one year at Olustee Florida, they used to have even dance in lake City, well away from the battlefield. One year, a group missed the last bus and saw a SCL (Family Lines at the time) freight heading to Jacksonville. Knowing that the train had to pass right by the entrance to the battlefield, they decided in their drunken stupor that they’d ride the freight and hop off. Problem was, they were going about 50 when they roared through Olustee. So they rode it all the way to Baldwin, a really long way East. In the day before cell phones, there was nobody at the battlefield to call to pick them up, so they walked all night and most of the day. They trudged into camp just as we were packing up from the actual re-enactment. They’d missed the entire thing. I saw a few of them and they’d looked like they had actually been in a real battle. I would have been maybe 11 or 12 at the time and from that moment on, being a hobo lost any appeal it ever would have had.
I guess riding a freight might not be all that bad if you have money to go to a hotel afterward and packing heat in case you run into anyone who wants to hurt you. But even then, in my mind it SO isn’t worth the risk. Like most things, people gloss over history and think being a hobo ‘back in the day’ was easier and safer. I doubt that strongly. I’m sure it was quite dangerous and people were killed all the time but you never heard about it back then because nobody cared what happened to ‘people of limited means’ back then.
 
#53
Howdy csxtattoo,
I rode a few box cars years ago when I was 18. After that I got into mountain climbing, which was a lot scarier and more dangerous. And now I'm middle-aged and afraid to drive or cross the street. :D

That's really cool. I have met a few really rad people on the rails. I have also met a bunch of psychos out there. Most of the time I have a blast. Sometimes it can be hell. What was the weather like when you were riding the rails?
 
#54
That's really cool. I have met a few really rad people on the rails. I have also met a bunch of psychos out there. Most of the time I have a blast. Sometimes it can be hell. What was the weather like when you were riding the rails?
I just did a few short trips during warm weather months. Nothing extreme. :)
 

East Of Easton

Wester Than Lester
#55
One of my Dad's anecdotes he subjects me to whenever we talk about his time on the Santa Fe. This would have been winter 1963, he was working the hump at Corwith (Chicago), pulling pins. A tramp walks up from under the bridge at 47th and Archer and asks him " This train goin' to California?" Answers "Nope, it just goes back and forth." Reply, "Oh, where's the train to California; need to find the train to California" and proceeds to walk up the yard lead looking for the train to California. Although my dad didn't see him again, he believes the dude settled for one of the open boxes in their cut and got a ride back down the hump.:confused:

Ran into a guy waiting to hop a train out of downtown Olympia once, don't know how far he got. :p
 
#56
I'm glad to see some curiosity on the part of the members here toward riders. we're not all bad people. i don't know the guy with the CSX tat, but I'll bet we know some of the same people and he'd be welcome at my house.

I rode for years, and still do on occasion. These days I'd rather have a comfy seat in a slave unit than a grainer, and occasionally if you meet the right crew......Anyway, here's a couple pics for you.
 
#58
Glad to hear there are still riders out there. I always wanted to do the cross country trip and probably will one day. I never looked at freight hopping as something that was bad. Freight hopping is to me the ultimate expression of freedom. You can go just about anywhere for free and with out people bothering you. It's a adventure and the stories are always interesting to hear.

I used to run into freight hoppers now and then when I worked for the Union pacific. Sometimes I would even find them in the locomotives when I was putting on the hand brakes. The way I look at it,if they don't have a problem with me and what I am doing then I don't have a problem with them and what they are doing.

Sometimes I would be checking brakes on my train about to leave town,and I would meet a rider. He would ask where we were going and when we were leaving and I would tell him. I can remember looking in the mirror in our locomotive going down the main line at 60 and seeing that person peeking his head out from one of the cars mid way in our train with the wind blowing in his hair. Many times I wanted to switch places with him and would have if they would have let me.

While as a conductor for Union Pacific many times I would opt to ride inside a gondola,a grain car,or just hand off the side of a ladder when we were switching cars around town. The engineer though it was weird I would rather ride the cars then the locomotive,but he didn't mind since he didn't have to wait for me to walk up to the locomotive or back the entire train up to pick me up.

Many hobos used to say riding the rails is either in your blood or it isn't. I know it's in mine and riding the rails is one of the most wonderful things in the world.

I also want to rant on people who are saying hoboing is very dangerous??? Give me a break. You know how times I was climbing moving freight cars in a yard in a single day while working for the railroad? Hundreds of times getting on and off. I was climbing ladders in the rain,snow,and wind on the 11pm to 8am shift the majority of the time. I was riding cars of all shapes and sizes in yards with horrible tracks. Yet a hobo who is typically getting on and off a stopped train and riding the main line is in more danger? I hardly think so. I also don't think a hobo is any more danger riding in the middle of a train then a crew in the locomotive. Typically accidents and derailments happens from the locomotive to the back of the train. That is why you rarely see derailed cars 10 or 20 cars back from the locomotive. I think if I had a choice I would rather be in the last car of a train than a locomotive when it comes to any kind of accident or derailment.
 
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#59
The back end is a pretty rough ride on a long trip, I always tried to stay toward the middle, or ride in a locomotive. And I agree, climbing onto a car is the same for whoever is doing it, worker or rider. There are some idiots out there that drink too much though, and I think that's what leads to tragedy.

It's fun, and definitely a good way to see the country in ways people who have never hopped can't imagine.
 
#60
The most that I will admit to is jumping on a IC&E manifest that just happened to be heading in the direction of my small towns liquor store. Track speed 10mph.

More recently I have offered soda, left over food, small bills, and tips on where the next train will stop.

I would never report somebody riding a freight car. IMHO society should take a step back and stop getting bent out of shape over victimless crimes.
 


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