Enjoy Flagstaff while you still can

Affiliate Disclosure: We may receive a commision from some of the links and ads shown on this website (Learn More Here)

#1
Well its official sadly! They said Mar 1 was when the quiet zone was gonna go in effect): Better go get as much horn while you still can.
:(
 

MP36er

Spelling DOES count.
#2
Oh man, what a bummer. People will be able to sleep in peace at night, the engineer's hand/arm/finger will get a rest, and the foamers will be crying and cursing the heavens.

Get a grip. I've lived in a quiet zone my entire life. And guess what? It's great being able to sleep at night undisturbed.
 
#5
mmm---interesting. There USED to be a concept that allowed QT between 10pm-6am in many places.

Now we're back to all or nothing.

Trying to make trains even more invisible I guess.

****sigh****
 
#6
Quiet laws passed by cities pose an interesting question. Do the cities take on the liability in a accident as a result of countermanding federal law, which require trains to sound horns or whistles at crossings etc.? I really have no opinion and just wonder if anyone knows of a court opinion on this. I have always taken responsibility for my own safety, but many do not.
:confused:
 

MP36er

Spelling DOES count.
#7
In order to qualify for a quiet zone, you gotta have lights and gates, and either a center median/barricades to keep cars from driving around the gates or four-quadrant gates. You can also just install wayside horns - which are directed down the road, but are about 50x more annoying than an actual train horn. You're more likely to get hit a crossing with only crossbucks than a fully-protected crossing with no train horn.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
#8
Quiet laws passed by cities pose an interesting question. Do the cities take on the liability in a accident as a result of countermanding federal law, which require trains to sound horns or whistles at crossings etc.? I really have no opinion and just wonder if anyone knows of a court opinion on this. I have always taken responsibility for my own safety, but many do not.
:confused:
Ames, Iowa has had them for about 11 years now. I do not know of a single case where the railroad has been held liable. Have they tried? Yes. Ames also has installed cameras at those crossings. It pretty much makes the case.

The steps are:
  1. Apply for a waiver from the FRA
  2. Fund the project
  3. Legislate the required liability and other state law waivers.
  4. Contract with the Railroad carrier.
  5. Contract with the State DOT.

It is expensive and has a lot of red tape involved.

On the plus side. Residents like them. Engineers like them. Engineers ears love them. Engineers grand-kids love them. It decreases the likelihood of a crossing accident.

I think this report from Mundelein, IL proves most appropriate to this discussion. www.mundelein.org/pdfs/WaysideHornIntro.pdf
 
Last edited by a moderator:
#9
In order to qualify for a quiet zone, you gotta have lights and gates, and either a center median/barricades to keep cars from driving around the gates or four-quadrant gates. You're more likely to get hit a crossing with only crossbucks than a fully-protected crossing with no train horn.
Durand, Michigan is a quiet zone and they do not have four quadrant gates or barriers in the median.
 

p51

Marty, it runs on steam!
#11
My wife will laugh when she hears this. When we went to the Grand Canyon in 2007, we stayed in Flagstaff for the rest of the week and our hotel with right alongside the old Route 66, about 150 yards from the former AT&SF main. There was a grade crossing about 3/4 mile away and the trains kept her up most of each night...
I of course slept right through them which irritated her even more.
 
#12
Norm Echtinaw said:
Durand, Michigan is a quiet zone and they do not have four quadrant gates or barriers in the median.
Same with Kirkwood, MO. The gates are long but they aren't 4 quadrant and there is no center dividers. The main road the tracks cross is a dangerous crossing, too.
For the quiet zone comment, I say that if there is a quiet zone and you want to hear horns, go somewhere else! There are probably plenty of crossings near by not effected by the quiet zone. And if I'm wrong, it isn't the end of the world not to hear horns.
 
#13
well, since my suggestion wont work I guess if you dont like it THEN MOVE. YOU DONT HAVE TO LIVE THERE! GTFO IF YOU DONT LIKE IT. I can sometimes understand how youd hate it at night but daytime.....no.
 

MP36er

Spelling DOES count.
#14
How long have Durand and Kirkwood been quiet zones? If they were quiet zones before summer 2005 or 2006 (I don't remember when the new rules went into effect), then they were grandfathered in and do not need to have the new safety measures installed. That's how it is near me.
 
#15
That's why. Kirkwood has been a quiet zone for as long as I can remember. I once heard someone tell me it took effect in the early 90's, but I don't know if that was accurate.
 
#16
How long have Durand and Kirkwood been quiet zones? If they were quiet zones before summer 2005 or 2006 (I don't remember when the new rules went into effect), then they were grandfathered in and do not need to have the new safety measures installed. That's how it is near me.
Guessing about Durand, but I'd say at least ten years.
 

eja

New Member
#17
As someone who enjoys visiting Flagstaff, I will certainly be looking forward to a better night's sleep. It will put me in a far better humour for the next day's train watching.
 



RailroadForums.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com

Top