844 on the Marysville sub 10-12-2012 Gibbon, NE to Marysville, KS

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GuyBucktastik

New Member
This video is my first that is worth of railroadforum. the rest you can find on my youtube channel, but i'll only pick out the quality for you folks.

No Shakey cam, I used a tripod. Mo motor zooming. (I still to get the hang of smooth zooming) No warning bell at crossings (my crossings were crossbucks only).

There is a little hiss on the shot West of Gibbon. Youtube normalized the audio.... I had my mic plugged in, but noticed no audio pickup from the whistle as the 844 approached. I unplugged the mic and used the built-in, but youtube amplified the noise that wasn't being picked up, hence the hiss.

The pacing shot was done solo. The tripod was set up in the back seat of the car, and I angled my rear-view mirror so that it showed basically what the camera was pointed at. It turned out great!

critiques welcome!


[YOUTUBE]aOrds01sUMM?hd=1[/YOUTUBE]
 
Last edited by a moderator:

papio

Active Member
Very nicely done. How fast was she traveling on your pacing shots? You kept up quite well :)
 

GuyBucktastik

New Member
BNSFFaninOK - Thank you! My dad used to take us kids chasing steam locomotives. Great family activity, I'm glad to hear you enjoyed it with your children!

8419 - Thank you, it was fun to make this video!

papio - I didn't pay close attention to the speedometer (always obey all traffic laws and posted speed limits! :) ) but I noticed between 60 - 70 mph. We know the diameter of the wheels, and can clearly see when they complete revolutions, so we could calculate the speed...... I'll do that some other time. err... we can calculate average speed of the observed time period. good enough for me. It was easy to keep up along these tracks, there were probably two other cars pacing behind me. On US 30 in Nebraska, there were more, and Nebraska State Troopers to boot!

UP Salina Sub - Thank you! Yes, it is a shame you couldn't make it. When she comes back North from Texas, we'll have one last chance. Hopefully my work schedule will fall magically into place like it did on Friday. And hopefully the wife won't find the gas receipts....! My other youtube videos are unedited, shaky, and AWESOME BECAUSE THEY HAVE THE 844!

Itsed65 - I know right? Aren't steam locomotives kick ass? Steam locomotives are one of Chuck Norris's only rivals.
 

GuyBucktastik

New Member
To find the average speed of the 844 (or another vehicle that has 80 inch diameter wheels, but who are we kidding, 80 inches is huge, they'll never build one like that again) over a period of 5 seconds, use the following:

.90909(pi)r = mph

r=the number of wheel revolutions in a five second period.
pi = 3.14159........


anyone care to check my math, it's pretty late, and I haven't figured out a problem like this since high school math!
 
C

-chet

Guest
I guess you just can't appreciate such a machine until you see and hear it at speed.

Amazing.
 

GuyBucktastik

New Member
I guess you just can't appreciate such a machine until you see and hear it at speed.

Amazing.


The sound of it is probably my favorite part!

chuchuga-chuchuga-chuchuga-chuchuga-chuchuga-

WHWHHWHWOOOOOOOOOOOWHHWHWHWHWHWHWOOOOOOO- WHHHHHWHWHWHWHWHWHWOOOOOOAOAAAAAOOOOOAAAOOO-

WHUH

WHUUUUUUUUUUUUUUWWWHWHWHWHWHWUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUU

chuchuga-chuchuga-chuchuga-chuchuga

that's the sound she makes going over a grade crossing, but in text.
 

CGW101c

CGW Fan
When the exhaust beats are barely disernable it is around 60 MPH. Anything after that is just really cool. About 20 feet per revolution. Great video. I love pacing
 

GuyBucktastik

New Member
When the exhaust beats are barely disernable it is around 60 MPH. Anything after that is just really cool. About 20 feet per revolution. Great video. I love pacing
the exact distance is 80x3.14159 inches per revolution, or 20.944 feet.

with two significant digits, we round up to 21 feet.

thanks for watching! I need to convince the wife to come with and drive while I jockey the camera and microphone.
 

Bill Anderson

Well-Known Member
I need to convince the wife to come with and drive while I jockey the camera and microphone.
I hope you can, but that pacing sequence was incredible for having been done solo. You did a very good job of recording the sound along with the action, which must not have been easy from a car.

The only machines which have souls are steam engines + Harley Davidson and Ducati motorcycles.
 

GuyBucktastik

New Member
I hope you can, but that pacing sequence was incredible for having been done solo. You did a very good job of recording the sound along with the action, which must not have been easy from a car.

The only machines which have souls are steam engines + Harley Davidson and Ducati motorcycles.
The last pacing shot I attempted, I setup the tripod in the front passenger seat of the car, and angled it out the front windshield. Having the camera in the front seat, there was HUGE temptation to peek at the viewfinder, or pan/tilt/zoom, or adjust other things having to do with the shot. Being that operation of a vehicle is a full-time job, and with decresed inhibitions and judgement created by the presence of the 844 and its massive whistle, I will NEVER set up my camera in the front seat again. When I set it up, I thought, "I'll just 'set it and forget it,' and enjoy the ride while the camera is on auto mode." While driving West on US 30 through Cozad, Maxwell, and Brady next to the UP triple track main I was shooting a glance over to see what the camera was catching every five seconds. VERY dangerous. Please learn a lesson from my actions, and let's all be thankful that nobody had to pay the price for my stupidity.

This shot, however, had the tripod setup in the rear passenger seat. The rear-view mirror trick worked better than I hoped. I only had to take quick glances at the mirror without turning my head, and clicked my cruise control up and down to adjust speed gradually after getting up to speed.



To get the ultimate pacing shot, I need to get myself into a helicopter. THAT would be a rush!
 

UP Salina Sub

Railfanius Extremus
the exact distance is 80x3.14159 inches per revolution, or 20.944 feet.

with two significant digits, we round up to 21 feet.

thanks for watching! I need to convince the wife to come with and drive while I jockey the camera and microphone.
Yes, I hope I can work out something,and catch her on the way back
 

CGW101c

CGW Fan
Now I gotta get the books out and if the 80" diameter is the diameter of the wheel or the diameter of the rail contact surface of the tire. And how much the diameter was decreased by the turning from the flat spot in Texas. All of these affect the speed. But who really cares it is really fun to watch.
 

GuyBucktastik

New Member
Now I gotta get the books out and if the 80" diameter is the diameter of the wheel or the diameter of the rail contact surface of the tire. And how much the diameter was decreased by the turning from the flat spot in Texas. All of these affect the speed. But who really cares it is really fun to watch.
screw books, reading is for children. let's try and observe the prototype ourselves! Anyone in OK or TX? If it comes back through Kansas, I'll try and get measurements at a service stop.


tell me about this 'flat spot?' also, if there is a flat spot on one of the wheels and the others are still round, wouldn't this negate the effects cause by the flat spot? only if there is a flat spot on all the wheels that are connected to the connecting rods.
 


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